Last edited by Sat
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

4 edition of Tigranes II and Rome found in the catalog.

Tigranes II and Rome

Hakob Manandyan

Tigranes II and Rome

a new interpretation based on primary sources

by Hakob Manandyan

  • 328 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Mazda Publishers in Costa Mesa, CA .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementHakob Manandyan ; annotated translation and introduction by George Bournoutian.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 201 p.:
Number of Pages201
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20002710M
ISBN 109781568591667
OCLC/WorldCa162502016


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Tigranes II and Rome by Hakob Manandyan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Editorial Reviews. "Tigranes II ( B.C.), known in Armenian historiography as Tigranes the Great, is the sole Armenian monarch who not only succeeded in unifying all the lands inhabited by the Armenians, but extended Armenian rule into Syria and northwestern Iran.5/5(1).

Tigranes II ( B.C.), known in Armenian historiography as Tigranes the Great, is the sole Armenian monarch who not only succeeded in unifying all the lands inhabited by the Armenians, but extended Armenian rule into Syria and northwestern Iran.

Tigranes II and Rome was written by Hakob H. Manandyan () in Armenian and published in Yerevan in Manandyan is revered as one of the major Armenian historians of his era but very little of his work has appeared in English. Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Manandyan, Hakob, Tigranes II and Rome.

Costa Mesa, Calif.: Mazda Publishers, He allied with Colchis (today’s Georgia) and with the powerful Kingdom of Armenia, ruled by his son-in-law Tigranes II, with whose help he acquired Cappadocia on Pontus’ southern borders, which had been a puppet of Rome.

Tensions then arose over two other Roman puppet states between the Roman province of Asia and Pontus: Bithynia and Phrygia/5(). Tigranes II ( – 55 BC) ruled ancient Armenia from early to mid 1st century BC. He was the son-in-law and supporter of Mithradates VI Eupator, one of Rome’s all-time greatest enemies.

Tigranes' accomplishments are somewhat difficult to evaluate, considering the negative bias of surviving, pro-Roman histories. Öz Ermeni halkının Anadolu coğrafyasındaki geçmişi çok eskiye dayanmaktadır.

Bu kadim geçmiş içerisinde pek çok lider başa geçmiş olmasına rağmen en bilinen yöneticileri "büyük" ve "krallar kralı" lakaplarını alan II. TIGRAN II, THE GREAT, king of Armenia (r.

BCE). Tigran (Tigranes) II was the most distinguished member of the so-called Artašēsid/Artaxiad dynasty, which has now been identified as a branch of the earlier Eruandid dynasty of Iranian origin attested as ruling in Armenia from at least the 5th century B.C.E.

Tigranes: a tale of the days of Julian the Apostate. Contributor Names Franco, Giovanni Giuseppe. - Julian,--Emperor of Rome,Fiction The books in this collection are in the public domain and are free to use and reuse. Credit Line: Library of Congress. Tigranes II and Rome: a new interpretation based on primary sources by Hakob Manandyan (Book) Tigrane II & Rome: nouveaux eclaircissements à la lumière des sources originales by Hakob Manandyan (Book).

TIGRAN II, THE GREAT, king of Armenia (r. BCE).Tigran (Tigranes) II was the most distinguished member of the so-called Artašēsid/Artaxiad dynasty, which has now been identified as a branch of the earlier Eruandid dynasty of Iranian origin attested as ruling in Armenia from at least the 5th century B.C.E.

Tigranes I had two sons, his successor Tigranes II (r. 95–55 BC) and Guras, who is mentioned by Plutarch as the governor of Nisibis. Guras was later captured by Roman general Lucullus. Judging by Roman author Lucian's Macrobii, Tigranes II was born to Tigranes I at c.

: Artaxias I. Under King Tigranes II the Great, from 95 to 55 B.C. Armenia thrived, and became the strongest state in the Roman east for a time. In the millennia leading up to Roman rule, the Armenian Plateau territory had processed and exported almost all types of : Dhwty.

– Cassius Dio, Rome, Book 36 “Pompey expelled Antiochus (XIII), from the government of Syria, although he had done the Romans no wrong The pretense was that it was unseemly for the Seleucidae, whom Tigranes had dethroned, to govern Syria, rather than the Romans, who had conquered Tigranes.” – Appian, The Syrian Wars, Book Tigranes IV.

Tigranes IV (30s BC–1) was a Prince of the Kingdom of Armenia and member of the Artaxiad Dynasty who served as a Roman Client King of Armenia from 8 Father: Tigranes III. Tigranes the Great. Tigranes II, more commonly known as Tigranes the Great (Armenian: Տիգրան Մեծ, Tigran Mets; Ancient Greek: Τιγράνης ὁ Μέγας Tigránes ho Mégas; Latin: Tigranes Magnus) ( – 55 BC) was King of Armenia under whom the country became, for a short time, the strongest state to Rome.

Dr. George Bournoutian gives a lecture and book signing in connection with the publication of his most recent work, Tigranes II and Rome. Tigranes II and Rome. In Mithradates II Armenian king Artavasdes, whose son Tigranes (later Tigranes II) became a Parthian hostage and was redeemed only for the cession of 70 valleys.

One of the most successful of the Parthian kings, Mithradates concluded the first treaty between Parthia and Rome in 92 bc. Read More; revolt against Tigranes II the Great. Tigranes the Great (Armenian: Տիգրան Մեծ (–55 BC; also called Tigranes II and sometimes Tigranes I) was emperor of Armenia under whom the country became, for a short time, the strongest state east of the Roman Republic.

He was a member of the Artaxiad Royal House. Under his reign, the Armenian kingdom expanded beyond its traditional boundaries, allowing Tigranes to claim the.

Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Manandyan, Hakob, Tigrane II & Rome. Lisbonne: Imprensa Nacional, (OCoLC) Then Mithridates, aided by his son-in-law Tigranes II of Armenia, took advantage of Rome’s troubles at home and retook Roman Cappadocia and Syria in the East.

This was the cause of the Third Mithridatic War, BC, and in a brilliant campaign the Roman legions led by Lucullus pushed Mithridates back into Pontus and drove Tigranes out of Syria. Tigranes II, more commonly known as Tigranes the Great (Armenian: տիգրան մեծ, Tigran Mets; Ancient Greek: τιγράνης ὁ μέγας Tigránes ho Mégas; Latin: Tigranes Magnus) ( – 55 BC) was King of Armenia under whom the country became, for a short time, the.

“Tigranes marched forth with an army of such huge proportions that he actually laughed heartily at the appearance of the Romans present there. He is said to have remarked that, in cases where they came to make war, only a few presented themselves, but when it was an embassy, many came.” – Cassius Dio, Rome, Book /5(1).

"Tigranes the Great" is a mod with 94 BC starting date, just one year after the crowning of Tigranes II Artaxiad the King of Armenia and ally of Mithridates VI of Pontus.

In this year Roman Republic is already the strongest power in the Mediterrenian, but there are still kingdoms capable to resist the roman ing System: Windows. “Tigranes marched forth with an army of such huge proportions that he actually laughed heartily at the appearance of the Romans present there.

He is said to have remarked that, in cases where they came to make war, only a few presented themselves, but when it was an embassy, many came.” – Cassius Dio, Rome, Book /5(). Tigranes II was the king of Armenia from 95 to 55 BC.

Article on the historical Tigranes on Wikipedia. – Cassius Dio, Rome, Book 36 “Pompey expelled Antiochus (XIII), from the government of Syria, although he had done the Romans no wrong The pretense was that it was unseemly for the Seleucidae, whom Tigranes had dethroned, to govern Syria, rather than the Romans, who had conquered Tigranes.” – Appian, The Syrian Wars, Book   Tigranes VI of Armenia, also known as Tigran VI or by his Roman name Gaius Julius Tigranes (Greek: Γαίος Ιούλιος Τιγράνης, Armenian:Տիգրան, before 25 – after 68) was a Herodian Prince and served as a Roman Client King of Armenia in the 1st century.

Tigranes was of Jewish, Nabataean, Edomite, Greek, Armenian and Persian en: Gaius Julius Alexander. Artavasdes II (Ancient Greek: ΑΡΤΑΒΑΖΔΟΥ Artabázēs) was king of Armenia from 55 BC to 34 BC. A member of the Artaxiad Dynasty, he was the son and successor of Tigranes the Great (r.

95–55 BC).His mother was Cleopatra of Pontus, thus making his maternal grandfather the prominent Pontus king Mithridates VI his father, Artavasdes continued using the title of King of Father: Tigranes the Great.

Her father, Tigranes III, died before 6 BC. In 10 BC, the Armenians installed Tigranes IV as successor of Tigranes III. In accordance with Oriental or Hellenistic custom, Tigranes IV married Erato in order to preserve the purity of the Artaxiad Royal blood line.

“Tigranes marched forth with an army of such huge proportions that he actually laughed heartily at the appearance of the Romans present there. He is said to have remarked that, in cases where they came to make war, only a few presented themselves, but when it was an embassy, many came.” – Cassius Dio, Rome, Book.

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Classical Latin: [ˈŋnae̯.ʊs pɔmˈpɛjjʊs ˈmaŋnʊs]; 29 September BC – 28 September 48 BC), usually rendered in English as Pompey the Great, Pompey Magnus or simply Pompey (/ ˈ p ɒ m p iː /), was a leading Roman general and statesman, whose career was significant in Rome's transformation from a republic to was for a time a political ally and Children: Gnaeus Pompeius, Pompeia Magna.

SELEUCID KINGS, TIGRANES II, the Great, King of Armenia (). Artaxata mint. Obv: Draped bust right, wearing five-pointed Armenian tiara. Rev: S L WS S L W G. Heracles, nude, lion's skin on the back, standing left, holding club with his right hand; in field left monogram, in right field.

Bedoukian Condition: Good very fine. TIGRAN II, THE GREAT, king of Armenia (r. BCE).Tigran (Tigranes) II was the most distinguished member of the so-called Artašēsid/Artaxiad dynasty (see ARTAXIAS I), which has now been identified as a branch of the earlier Eruandid dynasty of Iranian origin attested as ruling in Armenia from at least the 5th century B.C.E (see Armenia and Iran ii.; see also ARMENO-IRANIAN RELATIONS).

Tigranes II and Rome: A New Interpretation Based on Primary Sources (Armenian Studies) Hakob Manandyan Hellenistic Military Naval Developments W.W. Tarn Antigonus Gonatas W.W. Tarn (kind of went on a buying binge after I discovered the usefulness of Bibliographies XD) Books I am keeping an eye on for future purchases.